Thursday, April 25

Reading: River of Stars, Guy Gavriel Kay.

Kay's novels have been important markers in my life ever since Stephen Ball, a friend on events.scifi.com, turned me onto Tigana some time in the 1990s. I've said to other fans of Kay's work in recent years that I don't think he owes me as a reader anything at this point - enough of his work has mattered to me that I couldn't blame him in the least for coasting the rest of his career.

It's gratifying to find he's still got something to say.

Thursday, April 18

Quick notes on stuff from POSSCON last month that I still want to follow up on:

  • FreedomBox
  • ql.io - map APIs to SQL-like syntax. Cute. Useful?
  • The Rust Programming Language - "Rust is a curly-brace, block-structured expression language. It visually resembles the C language family, but differs significantly in syntactic and semantic details. Its design is oriented toward concerns of “programming in the large”, that is, of creating and maintaining boundaries – both abstract and operational – that preserve large-system integrity, availability and concurrency."
  • Firefox OS - mobile Firefox remains kind of flaky, at least on Android, but there's some legitimately interesting work being done here.

monday, april 8

maybe in the end there's but one
literary vocation, one task set the
writer, an essential craft
the ideal of which we may judge all writing by

maybe its greatest practitioners
are countless old ladies
writing letters to their grandchildren

Thursday, April 4

Using: NewsBlur (me), Pinboard (me).

Tuesday, April 2

Reading: Caliban's War, James S.A. Corey. Second volume of The Expanse. Essentially popcorn fiction, not without its flaws, but exactly the kind of actiony system-scale space opera I have been seeking for a while. Space marines, space battles, asteroid habitats, gunfights, powered battle armor, implausible last-minute escapes, interplanetary politics, etc. Morally kind of iffy at points, but thankfully not sophisticated enough to be especially nihilistic in tone. Clearly grounded in a number of the legitimate concerns of the genre (long-term survival of the species, rocket ships). I was afraid nobody was writing this kind of thing any more. Recommended.